Monday, February 1, 2010

333 North Michigan Building

Add caption

Add caption

Add caption

Add caption

Add caption

Add caption

Sculptural ornamentation on 333 N. Michigan Building..
The fifth-floor facade of the 333 N. Michigan Avenue building has intaglio relief panels on Indiana limestone. Each relief panel is seven feet high. Each depict major event in Chicago history..
Sculptor: Fred M. Torrey..
- Father Marquette portaging with Indians..
- Settlers with an oxen team..
- A hunter..
- A Native Indian [with a dog]..
- A pioneer woman..
- Attack on Fort Dearborn..
- Traders exchanging with an Indian..
In the images above, the hunter, Native Indian & pioneering woman have been shown in one image..

The relief panels are on two sides of the building,
along S Michigan Avenue, and along E Wacker Dr..
The only difference being that the Indian [with dog] is missing from the E Wacker Dr side of the building, which has only six relief panels..

Add caption

Add caption

Add caption

Add caption

333 North Michigan Building..
Address: 333 N. Michigan Ave.
Year Built: 1928
Architect: Holabird & Root
Relief panel sculptor: Fred M. Torrey.
Each depict major event in Chicago history..
Date Designated a Chicago Landmark: February 7, 1997..
One of the building that define the "Roaring Twenties" phase in Chicago..

Add caption

The plaque reads..
The outstanding Art Deco-style skyscraper helps define one of the city's finest urban spaces. Its prominence is further heightened by the jog in Michigan Avenue, where it crosses the Chicago River. The base of the building is sheathed in polished granite in shades of pink and purple. The upper stories are clad in buff-colored limestone and dark terra cotta, and are drmatically set back in accordance with the city's 1923 zoning ordinance.

2 comments:

adgorn said...

This building is a great example of why "looking up" while you walk through Chicago really pays off. Torrey also adorned the Armory at Washington Park.

Anonymous said...

Who are the busts of the individuals on each of the top four corners of the building?