Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Old Chicago Water Tower District







Image I: Old Water Tower
Image II: Chicago Avenue Pumping Station
Image III: Chicago Fire Department, Fire Station No. 98..

Old Chicago Water Tower District..
Address: Michigan and Chicago Avenues ..
It includes three buildings:
# Old Water Tower..
Year built: 1869.. Architect: W. W. Boyington
# Michigan Avenue Pumping Station..
Year built: 1869.. Architect: W. W. Boyington
# Chicago Fire Department, Fire Station No. 98..
Year Built: 1904.. Architect: C. F. Hermann

- All the three structures are part of the Old Chicago Water Tower District, which has been designated a Chicago Landmark on October 6, 1971 [amended June 10, 1981]..
- The Water Tower and Pumping Station were jointly added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 23, 1975.
- The Water Tower was also named an American Water Landmark in 1969.

The Old Water Tower and Chicago Avenue Pumping Station are the only public buildings to survive in the area destroyed by the Fire of 1871. Both structures were designed in a castellated-Gothic Revival style.

For more on ..
# Old Water Tower.. click here..
# Michigan Avenue Pumping Station..click here..
# Chicago Fire Department, Fire Station No 98..

Old Water Tower





Old Water Tower..
Completed: 1869
Architect: W. W. Boyington..
Old Water Tower [as also Michigan Avenue Pumping Station] is one of the few buildings that survived the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.

- The Old Water Tower is part of the Old Chicago Water Tower District, click here.. which has been designated a Chicago Landmark on October 6, 1971 [amended June 10, 1981]..
- The Water Tower and Pumping Station were jointly added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 23, 1975.
- The Water Tower was also named an American Water Landmark in 1969.

The Chicago landmarks website informs..click here..
The Water Tower was originally built to house a 138-foot standpipe, which became obsolete and was removed in 1911..



The plaque reads..
Old Water Tower..
This water tower completed in 1869, marks establishment of Chicago's second water works. Although most other buildings of pumping system were burned, it stands as a principal memorial of 1871's Great Fire.
Erected by Chicago's Charter Jubilee
Authenticated by Chicago Historical Society, 1937..




The plaque reads..
1869-1969
In this centennial the Chicago Water Tower has been designated the First American Water Landmark because of it's significance in the development of Chicago's water resources and it's symbolic identity with the "spirit of Chicago".
- Richard J. Daley, Mayor City of Chicago..




The plaque reads..
This tablet is erected in recognition of the outstanding services to the city of Chicago given by Dewitt Clinton Cregier
Engineer of Chicago Avenue Pumping Station: 1853-1879
City Engineer: 1879-1882
Commissioner of Public Works: 1882-1886
Mayor of Chicago: 1889-1891..




For more on ..
# Old Chicago Water Tower District.. click here..
# Old Water Tower.. click here..
# Michigan Avenue Pumping Station..click here..
# Chicago Fire Department, Fire Station No 98..

Chicago Avenue Pumping Station



Chicago Avenue Pumping Station..
Year built: 1869..
Architect: W. W. Boyington

- Chicago Avenue Pumping Station is part of the Old Chicago Water Tower District, click here.. which has been designated a Chicago Landmark on October 6, 1971 [amended June 10, 1981]..
- The Water Tower and Pumping Station were jointly added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 23, 1975.









For more on ..
# Old Chicago Water Tower District.. click here..
# Old Water Tower.. click here..
# Michigan Avenue Pumping Station..click here..
# Chicago Fire Department, Fire Station No 98..

Monday, September 28, 2009

Chicago Fire Department, Fire Station No 98..




Chicago Fire Department, Fire Station No 98..
Completed: 1904
Arcitect: C. F. Hermann.
It is part of the Old Chicago Water Tower District...
The Old Water Tower District was designated a Chicago Landmark on October 6, 1971..




The stone inscription reads ..
Dedicated in memory of
Lt. Edmond P. Coglianese
and all other firefighters
who made the supreme sacrifiece
in the performance of their duties.
Dedicated: Nov. 23, 1986..


For more on ..
# Old Chicago Water Tower District.. click here..
# Old Water Tower.. click here..
# Michigan Avenue Pumping Station..click here..
# Chicago Fire Department, Fire Station No 98..

Sunday, September 27, 2009

[Former] Engine Company 104





Former Engine Company 104, Truck 31
Address: 1401 south Michigan Avenue
Architect: Charles F. Hermann
Completed: 1905 ..
Designated a Chicago Landmark: October 1, 2003
In 1999, this building was completely remodeled and a restaurant was opened .. "The Chicago Fire Restaurant" ..



The plaque reads:
Chicago Landmark ..
Former Engine Company 104, Truck 31
Charles F. Hermann, architect
1905
The design of this firehouse incorporated many innovations aimed at achieving quick departures and providing more comfortable quarters for firefighters. Its Romanesque Revival-style details also make it one of the most distinctive and handsome firehouses in the city. Through their history and architecture, Chicago's historic firehouses show how ideas about fire protection and the firehouse itself evolved over time.
Designated on October 1, 2003
Richard M. Daley, mayor
Commission on Chicago Landmarks ..




The inverted Y symbol ..
The "Y" symbol, representing the three branches of Chicago River, is found on many municipal buildings in Chicago. However, in some instances the symbol is inverted, with vertical strip on top, as is seen in this case.. I have not found it explained anywhere, but read about speculations that this form may symbolize the reversal of the flow of Chicago River.





Now converted into .. Chicago Firehouse Restaurant .. click here .. Its website has some interesting information about its history and transformation to the present restaurant ....
The firehouse was built to serve the Prairie Avenue Community and its surroundings. Residents of Prairie Avenue consisted of many of the first families of Chicago, such as the Marshall Fields, the McCormicks, the Palmers and the Glessners. Prairie Avenue from 17th to 20th Street was filled with the many socialites of the day who had built homes following the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. It is believed that this unique firehouse, which is constructed of yellow brick and limestone [different from the standard red brick], had special attention placed on it in order to stay in keeping with the neighborhood and especially its residents.

The building stands in much of its same splendor today. However, some interesting changes have occurred. The stables, which used to house the horses for the wagons, have now been replaced with a courtyard. The upstairs, which once had a large room to store the hay for the stables, later transformed to a handball court and now has been transformed to a banquet kitchen. The remaining part of the upstairs contained the living quarters for the firemen; where the movie Backdraft was filmed now serves as our banquet space. Reminiscent of the old spiral staircase, which in the wintertime prevented horses from climbing upstairs to the living area where the heat existed, has now been relocated to our courtyard.

Mainstay made great efforts to preserve as much as possible, but yet still allow the operation to be functional as a restaurant. The tin ceiling, the glazed tile walls, the two fire poles located in the bar, and the chief's wall passed when entering the bar, are all original ..

The Second Presbyterian Church



The Second Presbyterian Church..
Address: 1936 S. Michigan Ave.
Year Built: 1874 ..reconstructed in 1900..
Architect: Original construction, James Renwirk..
Reconstruction: Howard Van Doren Shaw
State of Illinois designated a historical landmark: September, 1973..
National Register of Historical places: 1974..
Date Designated a Chicago Landmark: September 28, 1977..

Second Presbyterian Church organized in 1842 with 26 members. It an offshoot of the city’s original Presbyterian congregation, which had formed in 1833. The original church building was built at Wabash Avenue and Washington Street in downtown Chicago. It was designed by architect James Renwick, Jr.. It was known as the spotted church because of the tar deposits in its limestone blocks. The spotted church was destroyed by the Great Chicago Fire in October 1871..



After the original building was destroyed, the Second Presbyterian Church [this building] was built in 1874, at the 20th Street [now Cullerton] in South Michigan Ave. It was again designed by James Renwick. He designed the church based on early English Gothic examples, with a high-pitched gable roof, a rose window in the east wall, and a corner bell tower. The stone is Joliet limestone with sandstone trim. The interior was also thoroughly Gothic, with pointed arches leading to the side aisles and extensive stenciling adorning the walls. The sanctuary in the new building was dedicated in 1874. In March 1900, a fire destroyed the roof and extensive smoke and water damage devastated the interior. The church turned to one of its members, Howard Van Doren Shaw, for the rebuilding.



Shaw, abandoned the original neoGothic approach and redesiged the sanctuary on Arts and Crafts principles. He worked with his friend, the painter Frederic Clay Bartlett, and several other designers and craftsmen. Shaw lowered the pitch of the roof, expanded the balconies, crated the interiors with liberal use of dark oak and plaster reliefs. He planned an auditorium-style sanctuary, with no central aisle. This was appropriate for a congregation that emphasized preaching and musical worship. For the same reason, the pews are gently curved, providing good sight lines to the pulpit. Artist Frederic Clay Bartlett created murals in the balcony arches and the large "Tree of Life" mural that decorates the front wall of the church. It has nine windows designed by Tiffany.

The Second Presbyterian Church is an arts and architecture masterpiece and a historic and cultural treasure. However it needs massive preservation and restoration efforts. In 2006, "Friends of Historic Second Church", a non-profit organization was established to spearhead the restoration efforts..



The church has some interesting external ornamentation.. with the Four Evangelists..
St. Matthew [Human/Angel], St. Mark [Lion], St. Luke [Ox] and St. John [Eagle] on the entrance wall and gorgoyles and angels on the bell tower ..
# For more.. click here..



Architect Howard Van Doren Shaw and his painter friend Frederic Clay Bartlett designed every element of the interior to work together to create a restful and harmonious whole.. The west wall mural depicts the Tree of Life, a rainbow, and a procession of angels..
# For more.. click here..



The windows have beautiful glass works by famous firms and designers like Louis Comfort Tiffany, Healy & Millet, McCully & Miles, William Fair Kline and Edward Burne-Jones..
# For more.. click here..

For more.. [click on the link..]
# Second Presbyterian Church- II [External Ornamentation]..
# Second Presbyterian Church-III [Interiors]..
# Second Presbyterian Church-IV [Window Gallery]..

The Second Presbyterian Church - II [Exterior Ornamentation]



Continued from the above post.. The Second Presbyterian Church.. click here..
This post is about the external ornamentation..
- The head of Jesus above the entrance door..
- The Four Evangelists on the entry wall on Michigan Avenue...
- The tree of life, on the entry wall on Michigan Avenue..
- Gargoyles and angels on the bell tower.





The head of Jesus at the entrance, above the doors..









The Four Evangelists..
St. Matthew [Human/Angel], St. Mark [Lion]..
St. Luke [Ox] and St. John [Eagle]..





Tree of life..

















Gargoyles and angels on the bell tower..









These grostesques also on the entry wall, on the S. Michigan Avenue..

For more.. [click on the link..]
# The Second Presbyterian Church..
# Second Presbyterian Church- II [External Ornamentation]..
# Second Presbyterian Church-III [Interiors]..
# Second Presbyterian Church-IV [Window Gallery]..